Guasto Village Street Art

guasto village street art
Via del Guasto

Along Via del Guasto, an unassuming and potentially unappealing street between Via delle Belle Arti and Piazza Verdi, there are some unexpected surprises. What had a reputation as a drug-infested back alley in the past is trying to reclaim a safer yet still modern and edgy vibe. Guasto Village, which took place in the surrounding streets during the summer, was a way to give new life to the area. And while some complained and worried about noise and drink, others appreciated the Bologna Comune getting involved to improve the area. Being a university city, it all has a young vibe, but you don’t have to be a 20-something to appreciate the art on display.

This is a photo-heavy post, so I’ll keep the words short and let the art speak for itself. A picture’s worth a thousand words, so I’ve got quite a few thousand here! All of this is from just one stretch on each side of Via del Guasto. What’s your favorite work?

 

From Aliens to Mothers of the Resistance

Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna

Play Spot the Charlie Dog

Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna

Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna
Guasto village street art bologna

The Murals of Via Majorana

In Bologna, Via Majorana is a small side street technically within the historic city center. However, because of the proximity to the train station — a target in WWII — the buildings in the area tend to be post WWII. They still have portici and lovely colors in most cases, but some of the side streets are just as likely to be covered in graffiti rather than murals. Via Majorana, which has a large wall that serves to form a private courtyard off the back of some of the buildings on Via Mascarella, has often been the site of graffiti that ranged from little more than basic tags to more offensive words and sentiments.

This has been an issue in other neighborhoods, as well, so with the support of the city and Serendippo, a cultural civic organization, there have been attempts to change the walls into real works of art. In September of last year, artists were brought in — some from other countries in Europe, some local — to give Via Majorana a new look. At the same time, particularly as part of the Via Mascarella street party, some of the shop grates got a new look, as well.

Unfortunately, a few people complained, but in the end, the project went forward and everyone from residents to shop owners was happy with the final result. I was lucky to see some of the final work being done on the day of the Via Mascarella street festival. There’s a zen-like quality to the repeating patterns of the mural, as well as watching the artists at work. The flowing wave-like effect of the final work of art is both soothing and soaring. It’s definitely a positive addition to the neighborhood.

Mural, street art, graffiti, or simply art, no matter what you call it, I think it’s a great addition to a rebuilt section of an ancient city.

via majorana bologna murals street art graffiti
via majorana bologna murals street art graffiti
via majorana bologna murals street art graffiti
via majorana bologna murals street art graffiti
via majorana bologna murals street art graffiti
via majorana bologna murals street art graffiti

Check out my Instagram account for four more of the artworks being created on the shop gratings on the opposite side of the street from this mural. There are some really beautiful pieces.

Weathered but Wonderful Art

I’ve been thinking about doing a theme this week of some of the Bologna street art. As I’ve said before, there’s plenty of your standard graffiti, but there’s also a lot of really amazing street art. I’ve seen some in recent weeks that takes my breath away and really makes me think — and want to create.

However, this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge is “weathered” and while going through some of my photos, I came across a picture that combines weathered and wall art. I thought this might be a good way to start the week. On Via Zamboni, along the side of the church of S. Giacomo Maggiore, there’s a beautiful portico that happens to lead to the entrance of the Oratorio di Santa Cecilia. There are some grand Renaissance frescoes inside, but I’ve yet to see them as I always have Charlie with me and I’m not sure he’s welcome. Though he may be, as I’m pretty sure I saw a small dog enter once.

weathered Bologna street art portico oratorio di santa cecilia

Anyway, as I said, the portico itself is quite grand, yet weathered; a few signs of wear and tear, with a few columns that have lost some of their detail and wall art that has seen better days, but the inherent beauty and style is still obvious in the rhythm of the arches and curves and lines of the groin vault ceiling.

The portico, which is also technically part of the Basilica di San Giacomo Maggiore, dates to the 13th century and is attributed to Tommaso Filippi and has 36 columns. Along part of the portico are what were originally 16th century sepulchral burial arches, which often housed frescoes. Eventually, to protect the frescoes, they were moved indoors. However, the open arches became an issue, as well, and to prevent litter (and people) from accumulating within the recessed arches, reproductions of the frescoes now fill most of the spots. These bits of contemporary Bologna street art are getting a bit weathered themselves, though, and some have been removed and simply filled in with plain material. Works in progress, I suppose.

Still, on a drizzly Sunday morning when I’m feeling a bit weathered myself, the portico is a wonderful place to take a leisurely walk for a few minutes and enjoy the architectural geometry that is still beautiful, even when worn down slightly after more than a few centuries.

weathered portico bologna street art oratorio di santa cecilia

My Favorite Italian Cities #DolceVitaBloggers

Ok, so technically the #DolceVitaBloggers theme for January is your favorite Italian city. Singular. But how do you choose? Even if you’ve only been to a handful? Before living here, I would have probably said Florence. As someone who studied art history and fell in love with the Italian Renaissance, it’s kind of hard not to love Florence. It was such an important city during the period. Plus, it’s home to my beloved Palazzo Strozzi. It’s also the first city I visited in Italy.

But on later visits, I found more places to love. Ravenna, Mantova, Venice, and of course, Bologna. I’ve been to Milan, but for various reasons, it’s not a favorite. I have mixed emotions based on mixed memories. And for the purposes of this post, which is going to be photo heavy, I can only find two photos from Milan: the Galleria and La Scala. Not even the Duomo! So just as well that Milan doesn’t make my list. Although I will always fondly remember one of the guards in the Pinacoteca there pointing out to me the best place to stand to view one of the Caravaggio paintings on display. Mega points for that!

But that’s part of my reason for loving different cities. It’s the art and particularly the architecture that I go to see specifically. So it’s not necessarily choosing my favorite cities; it’s choosing my favorite architectural gems. And that’s nearly impossible. But inevitably, when you visit a city, for whatever reason, it’s hard not to come away with special memories. And while they may be private jokes or just an overall sense of gezelligheid that you’re left with after the trip, each city becomes special in its own way. So in trying to limit it all, here are my top three. Technically, I blogged a bit about Venice yesterday, so I won’t repeat myself, even though Venice is definitely way up there!

Bologna (My new favorite Italian city)

At this point, Bologna probably is my favorite city, in part because it’s where I call home and it’s starting to feel more like home, but also because it’s just a really beautiful city. I took a two-hour walk this morning with Charlie, going in a few new directions and discovering new wonders. Even on a dreary day, the colors may be a bit muted, and the portici may be more necessary, but it’s hard to walk far and not find yourself whispering “ma che bello” as you see some stunning colonnade, architectural gem, fantastic street art, or a color that defies the grey of the sky. I really do recommend looking through more of my blog or Instagram to see more photos of just how beautiful this city really is. These following three barely scratch the surface.

Bologna #DolceVitaBloggers portici street art architecture favorite italian city
Bologna #DolceVitaBloggers portici street art architecture favorite italian city
Bologna #DolceVitaBloggers portici street art architecture favorite italian city

Firenze

As I said, Florence was my first stop in Italy (a long time ago so all of my photos are from film so they’re mostly photos of photos at this point, so excuse the quality). I loved Florence from the start and it was particularly exciting to see all of these buildings that I’d studied in detail. And here they were! Everywhere! Because I hate looking like a tourist, but I also had a somewhat decent concept of the city layout from my studies, I’d often set off in a general direction and usually found what I was looking for. My friend Cathy who bravely accompanied me on this journey might disagree or at least suggest that there was a lot of extra, unnecessary wandering. Sometimes I just stumbled across stuff unexpectedly, like the Palazzo Medici. Some stuff we never did find, like the Boboli Gardens, but that turned into a joke about there being dragons on that side of the river.

But my main goal was to see the Palazzo Strozzi and the Palazzo Vecchio and of course the Duomo, Baptistry, and Campanile. Il Cronaca! Brunelleschi! Giotto! Oh my!

Palazzo Strozzi Florence Firenze renaissance architecture
Palazzo Strozzi (too big to fit into one photo). Look at that rustication!
Florence Firenze #DolceVitaBloggers favorite italian city architecture
A happy girl with her Palazzo Strozzi rustication.
Florence Firenze #DolceVitaBloggers favorite italian city architecture
The courtyard of the Palazzo Strozzi
Florence Firenze #DolceVitaBloggers favorite italian city architecture
Palazzo Vecchio
Florence Firenze #DolceVitaBloggers favorite italian city architecture
Brunelleschi’s Dome

 Mantova

I could really keep adding cities, but I’m going to limit myself to just one more, Mantova (Mantua). I went specifically to see the Palazzo Te, but while there, I stumbled across Alberti’s Basilica di Sant’Andrea (and my reaction to seeing it unexpectedly has become a running joke with G and me). We saw the outside of the Palazzo Ducale and the St. George Castle, but mainly just wandered around and enjoyed how pretty the city is. As I said, I went specifically for Palazzo Te because it’s stunning, but also because one of my favorite professors had studied it fairly extensively and written about it, so we benefited from his extra knowledge.

So I’ll leave you for now with some photos taken at the Palazzo Te. If you want to see the favorite Italian city of other Italy-loving bloggers, check out the #DolceVitaBloggers via Kelly at Italian at Heart, Jasmine at Questa Dolce Vita, and Kristie at Mammaprada. Every month, they invite bloggers to post on the seventh of each month on a particular topic. Follow their blogs and/or social media to keep up to date with reading and participating.

Mantova #dolcevitabloggers palazzo te favorite italian city
Mantova #dolcevitabloggers palazzo te favorite italian city
Mantova #dolcevitabloggers palazzo te favorite italian city
Mantova #dolcevitabloggers palazzo te favorite italian city

Specialty Food Shops in the Heart of Bologna

Just off Piazza Maggiore, you’ll find a number of small streets filled with Bologna specialty food shops that are foodie heaven. This is part of the Quadrilatero and these shops are part of the food market tradition in these streets that date back to the medieval period, if not further. Small shops dedicated to top-quality Italian classic ingredients. There are the fruit and vegetable stalls, the butcher, the fishmonger, cheese, bread, chocolate, and many more variations on a foodie theme. These narrow streets are always busy, even more so during the holiday season. And yes, those are eels in the white box on the bottom right. Just one of the many types of seafood you’ll find on offer.

bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie

With New Year’s Eve fast approaching, we went to one of the butchers to get the ingredients for the classic lasagne that G makes. After all, that’s one of the famous dishes that traces some of its origins to this part of Italy. Emilia-Romagna lasagne is made up of ragú bolognese, bechamel, parmigiano, and the pasta sheets, which can be regular or made with spinach for a lasagne verde. Nothing else! There are other versions in the country, but this is the version most common in northern Italy. And that’s all I’ll say on that, before someone from another region complains. 😉 I love to eat Italian food, but talking or writing about it? No, thanks! Too easy to make a mistake and offend someone!

The butcher we go to is the Macelleria Agnoletto & Bignami on Via Pescherie Vecchie. Even if that wasn’t where the family usually goes, I think I would have wanted to go, just for the sign. I noticed it last week and couldn’t resist squeezing in a quick shot, despite having Charlie with me and numerous tourists and locals passing through the narrow street. I find it kind of hilarious and a brilliant design!

macelleria bologna specialty food shops

As well as the fresh meat and poultry available (just take a number to get served), there is also a selection of meats and cheeses, from the obvious parmigiano to bresaola, mortadella, and other charcuterie classics. Plus, wines, olive oils, sauces, and so much more.

bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie

bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie

bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie

These aren’t necessarily the most affordable shops, but you do get a broader selection than in the local grocery stores. There are also shops where you can buy some lovely pasta, as well. We were considering some tortellini, but that might have to wait for later into the new year.

Whether you’re purchasing for a special occasion, taking advantage of having a kitchen in an AirBnB place, or just want to window shop, there are plenty of Bologna specialty food shops to tempt you in the Quadrilatero. Some day, I may even get some decent photos, instead of really quick snaps between all of the shoppers. A new year’s resolution, perhaps. For now, a few more snaps along Via Pescherie Vecchie.

bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie
bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie
bologna specialty food shops Via Pescherie Vecchie

The French Christmas Market … in Italy.

christmas market
Along with the regular markets taking place throughout the week, a new influx of holiday markets has arrived. Some have come and gone, while others hold out through the new year. Some are purely Italian, while others have a more foreign flavor. Once such market is il villaggio di natale francese, the French Christmas Village. This little Christmas market has packed up and said au revoir for the season, but we managed to stop by for a quick visit on its last night in town.

The market took place in the Piazza Minghetti, which is a charming little square surrounded by some beautiful, classical-style buildings. It’s also just a short walk from some of the fanciest shops in town, as well as some of the most beautifully decorated portico ceilings in the city. While the stalls weren’t excessive in number, they were certainly picturesque. They reminded me of some of the wooden Christmas market stalls that were set up frequently in Utrecht for some of the festivities in recent years. All that was missing was a light dusting of snow and some reindeer for a pure holiday display.

christmas market bologna piazza minghetti

The stalls themselves sold a variety of wares, including a spice stall that had me seriously considering buying some pink pepercorns and some of the various curry spice blends they had on offer. Of course, there was also plenty of cheese, hats, fabric pieces, chocolates, macarons, decorations, and other odds and ends. You could also purchase drinks and food to enjoy right there. I do slightly regret not giving in and trying some of the numerous hot dishes, including the cassoulet. Everything smelled divine and my mouth was watering.

The one stall I ended up not being able to resist was the cookie/biscuit stall. Sure, they had the classic madeleines, but they also had macaroons, which are delicious mounds of lightly sweetened shredded coconut on a biscuity base, with drizzles of chocolate. For my fellow Americans, think of a fancier, bigger version of the beloved Girl Scout Samoa/Caramel deLite cookies. They are perfect and I’m so glad I gave in and got some. In fact, I bought four, just enough to allow me one a day through Christmas. They are my morning treat with my coffee, a perfect combination.
christmas market cookie biscuit stall bologna

christmas market cookies samoa coconut girl scouts bologna

We missed the elves, which a friend told me about, but in all, I’m glad we stopped by this little bit of France in Bologna. It was the perfect size; big enough to be appealing rather than overwhelming.

There are a few more Christmas markets in Bologna that I’d like to visit (or revisit, in one case) before the end of the holiday season. Whether I make it or not, at least I’ve seen a couple that are helping me get into the holiday spirit.
Joyeux Noël!

christmas market bologna french

christmas market bologna italy

The Return of Neptune (Nettuno)

nettuno neptune fountain bologna

For more than a year, if you’ve wandered around Piazza Maggiore, admiring the Basilica di San Petronio, walking up the unusual steps to the Salaborsa, or visited the Bologna Welcome tourism offices, you can’t help but notice a large, temporary, shrouded structure towering over everyone passing by. In fact, on some of the maps visitors may have picked up, it might have referred to that as Piazza del Nettuno. But where’s Il Nettuno (Neptune)?

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
Il Nettuno, in this case, is a massive fountain that has undergone extensive renovation and restoration over the past year or more. Considering all that the statue and fountain has been through since it was completed by Giambologna around 1567 — not to mention some of the less than ideal restorations done in the past — this current restoration was particularly important.

Fortunately, even throughout the restoration, it has been possible to see the fountain of Neptune, just in a slightly less traditional manner. Special guided tours have been available, giving visitors a chance to go behind the scenes for a unique view of this famous fountain and from a bird’s-eye view that would normally not be an option. A series of ramps takes you around the entire fountain, slowly working your way up until you’re eye to eye with the grand Roman god of the seas. To be honest, look at him that closely and it’s easy to think that an ancient relative of Jason Momoa could have modeled for Giambologna.

The work has finished and the scaffolding and protective sheeting is gone. Now, on Friday afternoon, there will be an official ceremony to bring the Fountain of Neptune back to watery life. For now, enjoy some of these behind-the-scenes photos taken during the restoration. Hopefully, on Friday, I’ll take some new photos of the fountain in all of its restored glory.

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
A view of the top two levels of the base of the fountain. There’s yet another large level beneath this.

 

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
A hint of the giant himself amid the many levels of scaffolding.

 

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
The legs are almost a level of their own.

neptune fountain nettuno bologna

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
What can I say? He has a nice bum.

 

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
Showing off his curls … and those broad shoulders.

 

neptune fountain nettuno bologna
The statue alone is more than four meters tall, so he usually towers over everyone. It’s a rare chance to see him up close like this. Also note the trident. Maserati, the luxury sports car company, was founded in Bologna, and based its famous logo on this statue’s trident.

Towering Surprises

Bologna is filled with lots of narrow side streets and so many of those little streets have some sort of surprise along them. Beautiful colors, incredibly old palaces, and quite often a tower. The city, during the 12th and 13th centuries was like a medieval New York City, with skyscraping towers everywhere. There were possibly as many at 180, though most likely not more than 100 at any one point.

Most are gone now, though Le Due Torri (Asinelli and Garisenda) are now symbols of the city. However, there are still a fair few Bologna towers left. As you glance down a side street, you may find one of these many towers rising up unexpectedly. Just another reason to love this beautiful city.
bologna towers things to see in bologa

For what it’s worth, I believe this is the Torre Prendiparte, which is around 900 years old. It was a former prison and defense tower, but it seems it has been renovated and turned into a B&B and event spot. You can also ascend to the top, for what is surely a spectacular view.

Street Artists at Work

There’s a lot of random graffiti in Bologna, but there’s also some street art. In addition, the shutters that are used over the entrances to shops and restaurants when they’re closed are the perfect canvas. In the case of the shutters, the business usually invites an artist to create an eye-catching image. There are some fantastic works of art, some of which I’ve posted about before.

Sometimes, as happened last month, there’s an organized event with both local and foreign artists coming together to paint walls, shutters, and whatever else is available. Other times, you happen to catch a lone artist working early in the morning so the paint has time to dry before the shop opens. Regardless, I love seeing the variety of images and styles throughout the city. If you’re in town and taking an early walk before things really open, not only do you have the city to yourself, but you’ve got a great chance to see some of the fantastic artwork and you may just catch an artist or two at work.

All of that said, this might be my favorite bit of street art.

street art Charlie staffy staffy art shutter painting dog in art pitbull bologna

Here are a few random other shots of street artists at work in Bologna.

street art bologna architecture graffiti man on bike

street art in progress bologna

street art bologna mascarella shutters

 

Uncovering Books and Bononia at the Salaborsa

As I wrote the other day, the Bologna public library — the Biblioteca Salaborsa — is located in an area with seemingly as much history in its grounds as in all of the materials inside. Private gardens for papal representatives, public gardens to help develop modern botany, a stock exchange, and even a basketball court have claimed the land at one point or another for more than 700 years. Yet the history of the area dates back much further. Underneath the library, you’ll find Bologna archaeological excavations dating back the third century BCE/BC, though the first settlements date back to the 9th century BCE.

If you’re walking around on the ground floor of the library, you might notice some clear blocks in the floor. Looking down, you may just spot some of the ancient ruins of Felsina and Bononia. Felsina is the Latinized version of the Etruscan name Velzna or Felzna, which is what the Etruscans called what is now Bologna when they settled around 500 BCE. The Romans then came in around the second and third centuries BCE and renamed the area Bononia, based on the Celtic name that the Galli Boi gave the city when they conquered it around 358 BCE. It is particularly these later archaeological remains that are most visible.

salaborsa archaeological ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna
If you go downstairs on the left of the entrance, you’ll find a long hallway that leads to the actual archaeological remains, which are open to the public. As you walk down the hallway, you’ll see various images and maps, showing some what some of the structures would have looked like, along with maps of the city layout at the time. They designed the city plan on right angles, with the intent that it could be easily reproduced and expanded with the city’s growth. Some of that grid aspect remains in the area, but there are also plenty of smaller streets popping up in unexpected places and at different angles. That said, Via Rizzoli and Via Ugo Bassi still represent part of the west to east aspect of the grid.

The Bologna archaeological excavations took place in the 1990s and they discovered that the old forum of Bologna was located on what is now Via Ugo Bassi. The forum wasn’t all they found. They also uncovered a number of buildings, three wells, and even a sewer system. Not the nicest thing to think about, but oh, so important!

So once again, a visit to the Biblioteca Salaborsa is definitely one of the things you should do in Bologna. Entrance is free to the library and to the archaeological remains, although donations are appreciated. You can wander through the remains on your own and there are information posts at various spots in Italian and English to give you a sense of what you’re seeing. It is also possible to take a guided tour, but that is something you have to register for and it probably comes with a fee.

It really is a fairly quick but interesting look at the remains and the different levels, building materials, and more. Plus, it’s kind of fun to be subterranean and look up at the feet overhead.

Bologna archaeological excavations salaborsa ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna

Bologna archaeological excavations salaborsa ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna

Bologna archaeological excavations salaborsa ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna

Bologna archaeological excavations salaborsa ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna

Bologna archaeological excavations salaborsa ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna

Bologna archaeological excavations salaborsa ruins bononia bologna things to do in bologna

 

 

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