Wordless Wednesday: Not Quite the Classic Vespa

italian vespa italian architecture motorbikes

italian vespa italian architecture motorbikes

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Pedestrian but Civilized

While visiting Florence the other week, the weather was warm, the sun was shining down, and we were miserable. Well, not miserable, but seriously, y’all, it was hot! I know plenty of people who love warm weather, but that’s not G and me. We arrived at the consulate early, and while it was next to the Arno, the sun was beating down on us, with no immediate shade on that side of the river. Plus, as a result of security, I had to wait to go into the building until it was my appointment time, so there was at least a half hour spent in the sun.

After the appointment, I ended up doing a few laps along the river looking for G who had to wait outside. I was going to call him when I was done, but having had to turn off my phone before entering the consulate, I realized that I didn’t have the SIM number memorized to unlock it. Doh! Fortunately, after just a bit of panicking and walking back and forth, I spotted him in a shady area behind the consulate. The shade — and the sight of a couple of cats — had lured him back there. While I cooled off, we made plans to find a small bar to have a quick lunch before going to the Palazzo Strozzi.

After walking in the sun for a few minutes, we decided to take our chances and head to more shadowed streets heading in the general direction we needed to go. The Arno side, though direct enough, was too hot. Fortunately, we ended up finding a cooler street that had a number of restaurants. While most were maybe a bit more touristic and heavier than we wanted, we ended up finding an attractive little bar with some tasty panini and a nice cross breeze.

Sated, we were once again on our way to the Palazzo Strozzi. Most of the streets at that point were narrow and shadowed. One of the joys of ancient city centers! firenze florence historic center centro architectureStill, the roads and walkways are often a bit uneven, with many narrow sidewalks cobbled. By the end of the day, after also wandering around the Palazzo Strozzi and then heading to the Piazza Repubblica, our feet were feeling the effect of those uneven paths.

Does it sound like I’m complaining a lot? I know! I sound like one of those expats/tourists. I hate those people! I promise, I didn’t complain about any of it the first time I went to Florence (although it was much cooler then). This time, I was there mainly for a bit of bureaucratic paperwork that was making me feel a bit stressed and the heat wasn’t helping my anxiety. Plus, by the end, my feet were really hurting, and just about everyone knows that foot pain will turn the sunniest personality into a grump. Blah blah blah excuses …

Mainly, all this over-the-top complaining is to explain why G and I were joking about how much more civilized Bologna is compared to other cities, thanks to the wonderful portici that offer shade from the sun, protection from the rain, and have smooth, even paths beneath them that don’t try to turn your ankle every two steps. The Bologna portici, which cover a huge part of the city, may be pedestrian walkways, but they are anything but pedestrian in their form and function. Many have beautiful marble walkways and some stunning arches and vaulting. And since this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge is “pedestrian”, I thought I’d share some of these civilized Bologna portici that came in handy on a recent rainy Sunday morning.

bologna portici covered walkways portico bologna portici covered walkways portico

bologna portici covered walkways portico
Many portici serve as covered terrace areas for restaurants, bars, and caf├ęs. They may look pedestrian when the shutters are closed, but they come alive during the day and evening, many with their own special lights and lamps.

bologna portici covered walkways portico

In Utrecht, we’d joke about people wearing bicycle helmets being tourists, as locals almost never wear them. In this case, part of me wants to joke that these are tourists who don’t automatically appreciate the benefits of the portici. And is that someone walking in a bike lane?! Tourists!*

*All tourist teasing and Florence complaining is purely tongue-in-cheek.

Montagnola in the Morning

I took Charlie over to the Parco della Montagnola this morning, and while we skipped the dog run area, we did head to my favorite section of the park. Even a quick stop has me waxing poetic.

On the far left of the park are the Scalinata del Pincio, grand and ornate stairs rising up on multiple levels. Dotted along the ledges and stairs are the evocative turn-of-the-century lamps. From there, you get a view down on Via Indipendenza, with the grand portici occasionally releasing people out onto the street. Then there are the actual buildings across from the park on Via Indipendenza that always look amazing in the morning light with the many shades of ochre from sunkissed yellow to well-aged orange. Even the windows of these buildings make a statement with their beautiful curved and arched pediments and the shutters that provide some contrast to the bright colors.

And that’s before you even get to the view of the Porta Galliera in the background.

porta galliera via indipendenza montagnola bologna

montagnola bologna via indipendenza scalinata del pincio

window pediments montagnola bologna

montagnola bologna colors

via indipendenza montagnola bologna

via indipendenza montagnola bologna portici

lamps montagnola bologna

Did I mention there’s also a grand sculpture at the front entrance of the park? Charlie wanted a closer look.

sculpture park montagnola bologna

Domenica Details: Porticoes of Bologna

via irnerio porticoes of bologna portici italian architecture

Think of Domenica Details as an occasional Sunday blog category where I take a quick look at a particular detail of something. In this case, I wanted to point out something about the porticoes of Bologna that I mentioned in my last post. As I said, they are a major feature of Bologna and they come in all shapes, sizes, and styles. From one building to the next, you can see major or minor changes. For example, in this case, you can see the change in style of the columns, from the ornate Corinthian column in the front, to the multi-colored square columns further on. The shapes of the arches change, as well, from high, round arches to more squared-off arches.

And yes, you’ll see all kinds of floors, as well, including some highly decorative ones, but I’ll save those for another day.

 

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