Learning Italian: The Nightly News Edition

First off, languages are not my strong point. At least not foreign languages. I mean, I’ve made a career out of English, but perhaps all of my language proficiency went into that one language. I studied French for four years in high school and then thought I’d try something more exotic when I went to university. Bad idea. After failingbumbling my way through Russian and Latin (Latin didn’t have a spoken requirement), I eventually went back to French in order to fulfill my language requirements. Learning Italian was not really an option while I finished my undergrad degree, even though it would have come in handy with my Italian Renaissance art history studies.

Traumatized or just burnt out from my language learning issues — along with a lack of a clear idea what I wanted to do — I didn’t go on for a master’s degree and instead joined the work force. Teaching art history at a community college was a decent job, but it didn’t really pay the bills, so I ended up becoming an obituary writer for the local newspaper. That meant my mornings were free. I ended up using that convenient schedule to begin taking Italian 101 at one of the local universities.

After struggling with various languages, it may seem weird to want to start learning Italian. However, I knew that if I were ever to return to academia, at least in the art history field, I was going to need to know the language. Might as well give it a try when it didn’t really matter in terms of grades and scholarships. Perhaps that lack of pressure helped. Perhaps all those years of French helped. Perhaps I just had a good teacher and a textbook and lesson design that worked for me. The point is that I ended up doing quite well in that class and picked up a decent foundation in the language and actually enjoyed it.

Scheduling issues prevented me from taking Italian 102, but regular emails with an Italian pen pal helped me keep up with what I had learned. I also started listening to some Italian music, reading Italian newspapers, and sometimes watching TG1, one of the Italian nightly news programs, which occasionally showed up on one of the random cable channels late at night.

Oddly enough, it was when G and I got together that I stopped using Italian as often. Go figure. I heard it often enough from him, and we’d use it occasionally, but there was no concerted effort on my part to continue learning. Moving to the Netherlands didn’t help. I had a new language to bumble through.

learning italian in italiano bookSo, here I am. Now living in Italy and really wishing I’d kept up with my Italian studies. Still, I do understand more than I ever understood of Dutch, despite my best efforts. Right now I’m using my old textbook and Babbel to review and brush off the rust. In terms of the European language levels (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2), I’m somewhere in the Bs, I think. I’m reviewing A2 level stuff right now and it’s pretty basic. I know I went much further than this in my studies. Still, the review does come in handy, because it’s easy to make mistakes, even when you know better. All that gender agreement! It feels more like a war of the sexes!

[I didn’t originally plan on that whole language backstory. This next bit is all I really was going to blog about. Obviously, I have language issues that need to be worked out.]

We don’t watch a lot of TV, but we watch L’eredità (a quiz show) sometimes, followed by a bit of TG1, the evening news that I used to watch many years ago. The news is hard to follow, particularly because of the speed of it all. There’s a lot to cover in 30 minutes, so catching much of it can be challenging. However, it wasn’t the speed that confused me recently.

In between each main news story, the anchor will introduce the next topic, as is typical. One thing I kept noticing each night — sometimes once, sometimes twice — was that the anchor would seem to say, “Grazie, grazie a Lei” right before the start of some of the segments. You see, it sounded like they were saying thank you in an odd, formal, but wrong way. It was particularly odd that it was only before some stories and not others. Why?! I kept meaning to ask about it, but didn’t want to interrupt and then would forget about it. Finally, though, I had a chance to ask.

G was confused at first and rightly so. Then it dawned on him what I was talking about. It turns out the anchor was introducing the name of the reporter covering the story: Grazia Graziadei. Because of course that’s her name. I think I can be excused for making such a mistake. It’s right up there with the footballer whose last name is Immobile. Ah, the joys and confusion of life in another language.

Well, that’s enough of my language travails for now. Time to get back to learning Italian. Grazie. Grazie a Lei for reading. 😉

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